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3 edition of Fuelwood production in a plantation of Alnus Nepalensis (Utis) in the Phewa Watershed, Nepal found in the catalog.

Fuelwood production in a plantation of Alnus Nepalensis (Utis) in the Phewa Watershed, Nepal

B. P. Kharel

Fuelwood production in a plantation of Alnus Nepalensis (Utis) in the Phewa Watershed, Nepal

by B. P. Kharel

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Published by His Majesty"s Govt. of Nepal, United Nations Development Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Kathmandu .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby B.P. Kharel and R.P. Mulder.
ContributionsMulder, R. P. , Watershed Management and Conservation Education Project (Nepal)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofiche 90/62654 (S)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination17, viii leaves
Number of Pages17
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2004674M
LC Control Number90902772

fitted according to demand. Book and shoe racks are made by joining the plank chips (Fig. 16). Cottage timber such as door window frames and other timbers made from the mature woods of. Alnus. are being sold at profit over the investment cost. Discussion. Alnus nepalensis and A. nitida are growing in natural forests of Nepal, but Alnus. Alnus nepalensis D. Don Mature fruits. Photo: Zeng Dexian. Uses As a pioneer, nitrogen-fixing (Frankia symbiosis) species it is suitable for soil improvement and reha-bilitation of degraded lands. Seeds have been broad-cast to stabilise landslides. In Burma it has been used with success to reforest abandoned taungya areas. In.

g) Agroforestry for fuelwood production: In this system, various multipurpose fuelwood/firewood species are inter-planted on or around agricultural lands. The protective role is to act as fencing, shelter belts and boundary demarcation. the nurse plant Alnus nepalensis. Our results showed that A. nepalensis cultivation significantly decreased the total P concentration, suggesting the high remediation potential. Moreover, A. nepalensis improved the levels of soil-available N and K and promoted the growth of microorganisms, as suggested by the and even Cited by: 9.

  Foliar nutrient concentrations ofAlnusdecreased with advancing age groups of plantations and showed an inverse relationship with stand age. Annual N fixation increased from the 5‐year‐old stand (52 kg ha–1), peaking in the 15‐year‐old stand ( kg ha–1) and then decreased with increasing plantation by: Scientific Name: Alnus Mill. (Betulaceae) nepalensis D. Don. Related Plants. There are no related plants for species Alnus nepalensis. Nursery Availability.


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Fuelwood production in a plantation of Alnus Nepalensis (Utis) in the Phewa Watershed, Nepal by B. P. Kharel Download PDF EPUB FB2

According to the phytomass files (Duke, b), annual productivity of other Alnus species ranges from 5 to 26 MT/ha. Although used for nitrogen fixation, slope stabilization (both of which help the energy budget of a country), the alder is also used for firewood and might be considered for the generation of electricity.

Alnus nepalensis provenance trial. Report No.T/82, Pakhribas Agriculture Centre, Dhankuta, Nepal. Fuelwood utilization: a study of the demand and available fuelwood resources at six selected.

Alnus boshia Buch.-Ham. ex Betula leptophylla Regel. Betula leptostachya Wall. Clethropsis nepalensis () Spach. Alnus nepalensis is a plant of the warm temperate to subtropical zones, it can also be grown at higher elevations in tropical areas with high rainfall Excellent book, covering over 1, species of useful plants.

Native to the Himalayan foothills of northern India and adjacent elevated forests of northern Myanmar (Burma), Thailand and Vietnam, this fast-growing forestry tree reaches heights of up to 30 m ( ft) on favourable sites but is more typically 15 to 20 m (50 to 65 ft) tall.

It develops a slim, straight trunk gently widening toward the base, with silver-grey bark and a wide-spreading. Effect of Alnus nepalensis cultivation on soil biological and physicochemical properties during restoration near a phosphate smelter in Kunyang, Yunnan Province, SW China Article (PDF Available.

Alnus nepalensis Indian alder. Origin. South Asia. Ecology. Annual rainfall: mm. Normal temperature range: °C. Altitude range: m. Seasonal adaptability: tolerates months dry season.

Soils: prefers loamy, deep soils but can grow on sandy clays and gravel soils that are not too dry or compacted. Soils acidic or neutral. This leaflet on Alnus nepalensis contains brief notes on taxonomy and nomenclature, distribution and habit, botanical description, a fruit and seed description, flowering and fruiting habit, harvest information, seed processing and handling, seed storage and viability, seed dormancy and pretreatment, sowing and seed germination, and phytosanitary : D.

Jøker. Forest production is dominated by fuelwood use. Fuelwood will be the continuing major domestic requirement for the rural communities of Nepal for many years to come.

In more urbanised regions and in industries, the energy need if of fuelwood and to some extent fossil fuel and electricity. The majority of residents in the rural Middle Hills of Nepal use fuelwood from public and private sources as their primary energy source. This study investigated fuelwood availability in accessed forests, amount of fuelwood collected, preferred tree species for fuelwood, contribution of public and private sources to total fuelwood consumption, and investment in tree planting on agricultural by: Family: BETULACEAE Citation: Alnus nepalensisProdr.

Nepal. ; Hook. f., Fl. Brit. India 5: Malayalam Name(s): Tamil name(s): English. The most preferred species for fuelwood were: Alnus nepalensis, Quercus floribunda, Pinus roxburghi, Rhododendron arboretum, Rhus purviflora and Toona ciliata.

The information in this communication could be utilized for developing suitable region-specific and need-based alternative strategies for achieving sustainable fuelwood management at the.

The trees provide fuelwood, green leaf manure, and help in soil conservation. Farmers in India cultivate utis on the berms (mounded earth borders) of crop fields (Kayasha ). ACTINORHIZAL SYMBIOSIS. Alnus nepalensis forms a symbiosis with N-fixing actinomyeetes of the genus Frankia.

root nodule age-class transition, production and decomposition in an age sequence of alnus nepalensis plantation stands in the eastern himalayas [sharma, eklabya & ambasht, r.s.] on *free* shipping on qualifying offers. root nodule age-class transition, production and decomposition in an age sequence of alnus nepalensis plantation stands in the eastern himalayasAuthor: R.S.

Sharma, Eklabya & Ambasht. International Journal of Agriculture and Forestry3(6): DOI: / Organic Carbon in Soil and Biomass of an Alnus nepalensis Forest in Kathmandu, Nepal Khila Nath Dahal1, Gandhiv Kafle2,* 1Institute of Forestry, Hetauda, Nepal 2Faculty of Forestry, Agriculture and Forestry University, Hetauda, Nepal Abstract This article reports the results of measuring.

Introduction. The consumption of fuelwood is by now one of the most significant reasons for forest loss in many countries, and the estimates indicate that fuelwood accounts for over 54% of the total global harvest per annum ().The fuelwood demand in the country ranges from 96 to million tons annually, including a rural demand of 80– million tones, thus raising the consumption level Cited by:   Fuelwood species used in Karnataka.

According to the study Comparative performance of fuel wood tree species under wood lot system in the central dry zone of Karnataka.

Five tree species viz., karijali (Acacia nilotica), Bengali jali (Acacia auriculiformis), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus tereticornis), casuarina (Casuarina equisetifolia) and pongamia (Pongamia pinnata). Fuelwood is a major resource in rural areas. Fuelwood collection and consumption habits were monitored in Lupeta, Tanzania through household interviews and fuelwood collection walks.

Social dimensions, economic aspects of fuelwood, and alternative fuel sources were also examined. The study found that for all wealth classes. Conservation is the management of genetic resources so that they can provide the greatest sustainable yield to benefit the present generations while preserving their potential to meet the needs and aspirations of future generations (IUCN ).

More than 70% of the people of Nepal still depend largely on forests for medicines and other products. The species-wise extraction of fuel from the Gori Ganga Valley in Askot Wildlife Sanctuary in Uttar Pradesh, India, was studied.

Five shrub and 26 tree species were used as fuel, of which 14 were native to the Himalayas. Use patterns varied considerably with altitude ( m). Woodfordia fruticosa, Pinus roxburghii, Quercus leucotrichophora, Macaranga pustulata, Quercus lanuginosa, Cited by: Alnus trees are also used for sheltering tea plantations and cardamom farms.

CAT has recommended Alnus, Betula and Castonopsis trees be used for shiitake cultivation. The shiitake production data from 3 different tree species and 4 different strains are given in Table 2. Planting out stock of Alnus japonica of 30—45 cm tall is recommended for the Philippines in areas with altitudes over m and a rainfall of less than 50 mm/month during 4—6 months.|A spacing of m x m is commonly used for plantations of Alnus nepalensis in Nepal, although a closer spacing is desirable for fuelwood crops.The trees mainly Schima wallichi, Castonopsis indica in the central and eastern region and in western region-Alnus nepalensis and Pinus.

3. Temperate forest: Control of fuel wood and timber collection. 3. Intensive plantation. 4. Production\ capitative plantation: 5. Community forestry. 6. Afforestation of wet land. 7. National legislation.Alnus. Alnus nepalensis ; Alnus nepalensis is an accepted name This name is the accepted name of a species in the genus Alnus (family Betulaceae).

The record derives from WCSP (data supplied on ) which reports it as an accepted name (record ) with original publication details: Prodr. Fl. Nepal. 58